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What Types of Illicit Drug Abuse Trends Are Seen in Wisconsin?

Created On Monday, 21, October 2019
Modified On Wednesday, 30, September 2020

The abuse of drugs and alcohol remains a problem in the state, and overall the consumption trends and patterns mirror the national trends. For example, high school students in the state have lower lifetime use rates of alcohol and drugs than students in the nation. Marijuana in the state continues to be the most frequently used drug in the state, especially among high school students. The rates of drug use including marijuana, illicit drugs, and pain relievers are consistently high among young adults aged 18 to 25. The use of alcohol and other drugs causing addiction are significant health, social, public safety, and economic problems in Wisconsin.

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Each year in Wisconsin there are over 2100 deaths, 5000 traffic crashes, and over 2900 traffic injuries, 1500 cases of child abuse, and over 93,000 arrests involving drugs and alcohol abuse. The economic cost of drug abuse is close to $7 billion dollars, and crime and addiction are a common problem for many addicts. Over 60% of the prison population have substance abuse problems. Alcohol and drug addiction in the state is the fourth leading cause of death behind heart disease, cancer, and stroke. Drug and alcohol abuse is the fourth leading cause of hospitalization because of health problems. Within the state of Wisconsin is an estimated 456,000 individuals in need of treatment, and only 23% of them receive treatment.

It is estimated in the state that around 9.5% of the residents who are 12 years and older have a substance use disorder. The rate of alcohol or drug addiction in the state exceeds the national rate, and addictions in the state vary by age group, and 18 to 25-year-old adults have the highest rate. If you are struggling with a drug or alcohol addiction in the state, there are treatment resources to help. Throughout the state are both inpatient and outpatient drug rehab centers to treat any type of drug or alcohol addiction.

CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ARTICLE

Nickolaus Hayes - Author

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